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‘Frontline: Road To Moscow’ Review



If you’re a fan of strategy games, then the name Slitherine needs no introductions. If you’re not, all you really need to know about these guys is that they have been around the block a few times when it comes to this genre. They’ve made a board game, a bunch of computer games, quite a few iPad games, and only a few iPhone games, almost all dealing with the subject of war. Now, when it comes to strategy war games, certain wars are covered more often than others, but one of the cool things about Slitherine is that they’ve dabbled in a lot of unconventional settings, as seen for example in Da Vinci’s Art Of War [$4.99 (HD)] on iPad. I like a game based around Napoleon, Rome, or World War 2 as much as the next guy, but it’s nice to get outside the box now and then, you know?

I guess that’s an ominous way to start a review of Frontline: Road To Moscow [$2.99], a game which is most definitely based on World War 2. In any other year, I’d still be giving the game a pat on the back for at least going with the less common Eastern Front of the European Theater, but not only have there already been a couple of releases covering this part of the war in recent months, Slitherine actually assisted with one of them. That game is Tank Battle: East Front [$1.99], which I enjoyed when I reviewed it a couple of months back. Admittedly, Slitherine only contributed to the graphics of that game, but the two games end up having quite a bit in common anyway.

Photo 2014-05-27, 18 42 57Photo 2014-05-27, 18 42 57

Frontline is a turn-based strategy game that puts you in control of the German forces as they try to push their way into Russia. The basic game gives you 12 different missions to play, with two additional packs of missions available as IAP for $1.99 each. The battles take place on the land, in the sea, or in the air, providing some visual variety that turns out to change very little in terms of gameplay. Each mission has three goals to complete, though some of them are optional. Usually these missions involve either capturing a base by moving a unit onto it or destroying a target, but there are a few less common ones such as escort missions. You’re given an initial assortment of units on each map, along with some resources you can use to call in reinforcements, resupply your existing units, or perform an airstrike on applicable maps.

All told, there are a ton of different units you’ll be playing with, partly as a consequence of covering three different types of warfare. Each unit has special abilities you can activate, and as you play, they’ll level up, gaining access to new, more powerful skills. This lends the game a bit of customization, since the units you use most will be the ones that gain in power, while units you don’t make use of will lag behind. You’ll want to be careful, though, since you don’t get to choose which units you’ll have access to on any given map. It does you no good to have a unit type fully powered up when the next map won’t let you use it. It’s not a big concern when you’re playing on the game’s very lenient normal difficulty, but if you play on veteran difficulty, you’ll want to make sure you’re spreading the experience points love around a bit.

Photo 2014-05-27, 18 43 33Photo 2014-05-27, 18 43 33

The maps themselves are hex-based, with lots of different types of terrain that will put your units at an advantage or disadvantage. Certain parts of the terrain must be opened up by moving particular units through them first, and there are plenty of interesting choke points and places to ambush or be ambushed. The game includes bonuses for flanking, as well as the ability to knock units back with a powerful strike, stunning them for the next turn. I find the game does a nice job riding the line of accessibility and strategic depth, though its chips clearly fall on the side of the former. I’ve probably mentioned before that although I enjoy this genre quite a bit, my skill leaves a bit to be desired, but even with all of my usual mistakes and blunders, I was still able to punch my way through normal difficulty without too many headaches.

Frontline has an interesting look to it, with the units going for more of a board game look than reality. The level of detail is exceptional, so even though the animations aren’t terribly exciting, the game still has really appealing visuals. I especially enjoyed the maps with snow. The UI is really good, but it was a bit hard to read some things due to the small size of the text on an iPhone screen. I also had some trouble at times getting the game to recognize the space I was tapping, since the hexes in this game are a bit smaller than average. That one might be down to my sausage fingers, though. I do wish the game would allow you to undo movement, or perhaps confirm it, since a mistouch can send a unit to a place you really didn’t want it to go to.

I ended up enjoying Frontline: Road To Moscow a little bit more than Tank Battle: East Front simply because there’s a bit more variety to the game. Frontline, like Tank Battle, is a very straightforward strategy game that may not satisfy strategy veterans, but I think it has something to offer gamers looking for a less-intensive simulation than we sometimes see in this genre. This is all provided you haven’t gotten your fill of the Eastern Front of World War 2 yet. There’s a strong sense of deja vu here if you’ve been playing along with the recent Tank Battle releases, but while Frontline covers a lot of similar ground, it still manages to offer some cool elements of its own.

Publicado por: TouchArcade - Continue lendo: http://toucharcade.com/feed/

Tags:

‘Frontline: Road To Moscow’ Review



If you’re a fan of strategy games, then the name Slitherine needs no introductions. If you’re not, all you really need to know about these guys is that they have been around the block a few times when it comes to this genre. They’ve made a board game, a bunch of computer games, quite a few iPad games, and only a few iPhone games, almost all dealing with the subject of war. Now, when it comes to strategy war games, certain wars are covered more often than others, but one of the cool things about Slitherine is that they’ve dabbled in a lot of unconventional settings, as seen for example in Da Vinci’s Art Of War [$4.99 (HD)] on iPad. I like a game based around Napoleon, Rome, or World War 2 as much as the next guy, but it’s nice to get outside the box now and then, you know?

I guess that’s an ominous way to start a review of Frontline: Road To Moscow [$2.99], a game which is most definitely based on World War 2. In any other year, I’d still be giving the game a pat on the back for at least going with the less common Eastern Front of the European Theater, but not only have there already been a couple of releases covering this part of the war in recent months, Slitherine actually assisted with one of them. That game is Tank Battle: East Front [$1.99], which I enjoyed when I reviewed it a couple of months back. Admittedly, Slitherine only contributed to the graphics of that game, but the two games end up having quite a bit in common anyway.

Photo 2014-05-27, 18 42 57Photo 2014-05-27, 18 42 57

Frontline is a turn-based strategy game that puts you in control of the German forces as they try to push their way into Russia. The basic game gives you 12 different missions to play, with two additional packs of missions available as IAP for $1.99 each. The battles take place on the land, in the sea, or in the air, providing some visual variety that turns out to change very little in terms of gameplay. Each mission has three goals to complete, though some of them are optional. Usually these missions involve either capturing a base by moving a unit onto it or destroying a target, but there are a few less common ones such as escort missions. You’re given an initial assortment of units on each map, along with some resources you can use to call in reinforcements, resupply your existing units, or perform an airstrike on applicable maps.

All told, there are a ton of different units you’ll be playing with, partly as a consequence of covering three different types of warfare. Each unit has special abilities you can activate, and as you play, they’ll level up, gaining access to new, more powerful skills. This lends the game a bit of customization, since the units you use most will be the ones that gain in power, while units you don’t make use of will lag behind. You’ll want to be careful, though, since you don’t get to choose which units you’ll have access to on any given map. It does you no good to have a unit type fully powered up when the next map won’t let you use it. It’s not a big concern when you’re playing on the game’s very lenient normal difficulty, but if you play on veteran difficulty, you’ll want to make sure you’re spreading the experience points love around a bit.

Photo 2014-05-27, 18 43 33Photo 2014-05-27, 18 43 33

The maps themselves are hex-based, with lots of different types of terrain that will put your units at an advantage or disadvantage. Certain parts of the terrain must be opened up by moving particular units through them first, and there are plenty of interesting choke points and places to ambush or be ambushed. The game includes bonuses for flanking, as well as the ability to knock units back with a powerful strike, stunning them for the next turn. I find the game does a nice job riding the line of accessibility and strategic depth, though its chips clearly fall on the side of the former. I’ve probably mentioned before that although I enjoy this genre quite a bit, my skill leaves a bit to be desired, but even with all of my usual mistakes and blunders, I was still able to punch my way through normal difficulty without too many headaches.

Frontline has an interesting look to it, with the units going for more of a board game look than reality. The level of detail is exceptional, so even though the animations aren’t terribly exciting, the game still has really appealing visuals. I especially enjoyed the maps with snow. The UI is really good, but it was a bit hard to read some things due to the small size of the text on an iPhone screen. I also had some trouble at times getting the game to recognize the space I was tapping, since the hexes in this game are a bit smaller than average. That one might be down to my sausage fingers, though. I do wish the game would allow you to undo movement, or perhaps confirm it, since a mistouch can send a unit to a place you really didn’t want it to go to.

I ended up enjoying Frontline: Road To Moscow a little bit more than Tank Battle: East Front simply because there’s a bit more variety to the game. Frontline, like Tank Battle, is a very straightforward strategy game that may not satisfy strategy veterans, but I think it has something to offer gamers looking for a less-intensive simulation than we sometimes see in this genre. This is all provided you haven’t gotten your fill of the Eastern Front of World War 2 yet. There’s a strong sense of deja vu here if you’ve been playing along with the recent Tank Battle releases, but while Frontline covers a lot of similar ground, it still manages to offer some cool elements of its own.

Publicado por: TouchArcade - Continue lendo: http://toucharcade.com/feed/

Tags:

Qual o efeito da final da Champions no Twitter? Fizeram um mapa fantástico para mostrar

Admite, você fez isso. Não tem problema. Não é pecado, e todo mundo fez, coisa que ficou nítido olhando a timeline de qualquer um. Você está lá, diante da TV, vendo a final da Liga dos Campeões, e o Twitter fica chamando. É um impulso incontrolável. O resultado são vários tuítes, muitos deles inúteis, comentando a quase vitória do Atlético de Madrid que se transformou na décima glória europeia do Real Madrid.

 Continue lendo na Trivela: http://trivela.uol.com.br/final-champions-twitter/

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Publicado por: Gizmodo - Continue lendo: izmoizmododohttp://feeds.feedburner.com/gizmodobr

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Hackers estão usando o Find My iPhone para “sequestrar” dispositivos iOS

Uma estranha onda de sequestros virtuais de iPhones na Austrália se espalhou para os EUA e outras partes do mundo, e é realmente algo bizarro. Hackers aparentemente estão usando o Find My iPhone para bloquear dispositivos iOS remotamente, e então exigindo um resgate para desbloqueá-los. O tal resgate é pagável através de PayPal. Se acontecer com você, não pague.

Novamente, esses incidentes são bem estranhos. Relatos dos primeiros casos – inicialmente na Austrália – apareceram em fóruns da Apple nesta semana, seguidos por um relato de iPhones resgatados nos EUA. Usuários dizem que do nada seus smartphones foram bloqueados, com uma mensagem do Find My Phone dizendo que o dispositivo foi “hackeado por Oleg Pliss”.

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As instruções para desbloquear os smartphones são simples: envie US$ 50 para uma conta no PayPal e o dispositivo será liberado.

Não está claro se a falha acontece devido a uma vulnerabilidade no Find My Phone ou através de uma conta comprometida no iCloud. De qualquer forma, vale a pena mudar a senha do iCloud se você teme ser atingido. Com a recente falha no eBay, alguns acham que os hackers estão usando credenciais de outros sites para acessar contas do iCloud. Melhor garantir do que correr o risco de ter o iPhone bloqueado, certo?

Se você já foi atingido, o que deve fazer é restaurar seu dispositivo iOS para configuração de fábrica para liberá-lo – os passos, em inglês, estão aqui. E se você pagou o resgate, o PayPal diz que vai reembolsar sua grana. O PayPal diz que nenhuma conta bate com o endereço de email presente no pedido de resgate. Isso é muito estranho. [The Age viaGigaOm]

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Publicado por: Gizmodo - Continue lendo: izmoizmododohttp://feeds.feedburner.com/gizmodobr

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‘Battleheart Legacy’ is Now Available Worldwide

It was just last week we learned Mika Mobile’s follow-up to Battleheart was submitted to Apple, so when we saw the game show up in the New Zealand App Store this morning we weren’t totally sure if it was some sort of soft-launch, an accident, or what. Well, it turns out it was simply a very fast approval process and the release date was set for May 28th, a day earlier than the typical App Store release day, which means that Battleheart Legacy [$4.99] is now officially out in the US and the rest of the world.

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It’s been quite a journey, but Battleheart Legacy is finally here. Not that it was a particularly long development, as the game was only announced last November, but the original Battleheart was just so great that it made this follow-up especially hard to wait for. I’m impatiently watching my own download progress tick by ever so slowly, but so far all the early impressions in our forums have been overwhelmingly positive. Whether you were a fan of the first Battleheart and are looking for this unique spin on the formula, or are simply a fan of action RPGs of all kinds, you’ll definitely want to check out Battleheart Legacy.

Publicado por: TouchArcade - Continue lendo: http://toucharcade.com/feed/

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