Receba atualizações no seu Facebook. Basta curtir a nossa página abaixo:

 

Cientistas criaram um motor minúsculo, mas não sabem como ele funciona

Deve ser divertido inventar coisas. Um dia uma coisa não existe, e na outra ela existe. Mas como você se sentiria se não soubesse exatamente o motivo da sua invenção funcionar? As cabeças por trás deste novo motor microscópico estão passando por isso.

Vitaly Svetovoy, da Universidade de Twente, na Holanda, é um engenheiro elétrico que recentemente anunciou um micromotor capaz de produzir forças poderosas usando apenas água e um pequeno choque de eletricidade. “Este atuador é o primeiro passo para motores de combustão verdadeiramente microscópicos”, explicou a equipe de Svetovoy em um artigo sobre o motor.

clqmeia9f8xldddmjgdsO único problema é que os cientistas não têm certeza de como a coisa funciona. Obviamente eles entendem as linhas gerais. O micro-motor de combustão consiste em uma câmara cheia de água com dois eletrodos rodando dentro dela. Quando a corrente passa pelo eletrodo, a água se dissocia em hidrogênio e oxigênio e forma nanobolhas. Quando a corrente é desligada, o volume das bolhas é o suficiente para deformar uma membrana que mantém tudo junto. Os cientistas não sabem o porquê.

De qualquer forma, ele produz bastante torque para um motor com apenas 100 nanômetros de largura. Eles acham que a força pode vir do hidrogênio e do oxigênio nas nanobolhas entrando em combustão espontânea, mas não têm certeza. Mas será que isso importa? Fazemos diversas coisas espetaculares com o nosso cérebro e não sabemos como ele funciona também. [Tech Review]

Imagem via Shutterstock

  • RELACIONADOS
  • DESTAQUES
  • POPULARES


fone

Metadados do seu celular podem revelar muitos dos seus segredos


Internet

No aniversário de 25 anos, a web corre sério risco de se fragmentar


Screen Shot 2014-03-12 at 9.59.44 AM

Esta tiara elétrica promete acabar com as dores da enxaqueca


cj9doj9btr1jtie3q7dl

O LED mais fino do mundo tem três átomos de espessura


nomades1

Eu, Fernanda Neute, nômade digital. Ou como coloquei meu escritório na praia.


lg tv ces 2014

De tablets a TVs, o que vem por aí nas tecnologias de telas


truedetective2

Sim, você realmente precisa assistir a nova série True Detective


Ivanpah Solar  (1)

As fotos da maior usina solar do mundo, que começou hoje a gerar eletricidade


Cientistas desvendam o mistério de experiências fora do corpo

Cientistas desvendam o mistério de experiências fora do corpo


Por que os celulares de passageiros do avião que sumiu na Malásia continuam tocando

Por que os celulares de passageiros do avião que sumiu na Malásia continuam tocando


Uso de apps e grupos de carona podem gerar multa de R$ 5 mil, segundo a legislação brasileira

Uso de apps e grupos de carona podem gerar multa de R$ 5 mil, segundo a legislação brasileira


Esse mapa mostra a média de leitura semanal de vários países e estamos perdendo feio

Esse mapa mostra a média de leitura semanal de vários países e estamos perdendo feio

Publicado por: Gizmodo - Continue lendo: izmoizmododohttp://feeds.feedburner.com/gizmodobr

Tags: , ,

‘The Wolf Among Us’ Episode 1 & 2 Review


$4.99
Buy Now

The first thing that happens in Telltale Games’ The Wolf Among Us [$4.99] is that Sheriff Bigby Wolf talks to a toad in a cardigan. The second thing, at least for me, is that he gets beaten to death (twice). Apparent cause of death is an axe handle through the eye socket, but I’m no doctor.

That’s a hell of a first impression for the series, adapted from Bill Willingham’s Fables franchise. Fables’ premise—that fairytale characters have come to live in the real-world Bronx—isn’t uncommon: The 10th Kingdom and Neil Gaiman’s American Gods both predate Willingham, and contemporary shows like Once Upon A Time and Sleepy Hollow continue the unevenly handled tradition.

The violence in this introduction stands out as a way to overcompensate for The Wolf Among Us’ inherent silliness, to convince us that it’s brutal and dark. The overwhelmingly grisly murder that sets the game in motion only reinforces that idea.

The bloody posturing is unnecessary, as the The Wolf Among Us has enough grit and texture to stand on its own without drawn-out fight scenes or swear words. The game draws its tension and mood from Fabletown’s deep violets and navy blues, from a dusky soundtrack, from punchy voice-acting. The racism and classism that undergird the world of Fables and what’s left unsaid between characters are both sadder and more desperate than the blood and broken bones Telltale chooses to highlight first.

Still, Telltale are remarkably efficient alchemists when it comes to Willingham’s settings and premises. Telltale have an ear for dialogue and a genuine knack for plotting and pacing, but the promise of exploring more of the beautifully realized Fabletown is compelling too. Bigby’s punchy melodrama aside, The Wolf Among Us would still be interesting as a political fable, and if there’s one criticism, it’s that Telltale keeps the reigns too tight and doesn’t offer enough chances to poke around at the seams of Fabletown.

Adventure games—from Sam Max’s goofball slapstick to The Shivah’s dour fatalism—usually handle investigations and cop stories well: You talk to people, gather clues, and make connections. Bigby does those things in The Wolf Among Us, too, but they don’t culminate in some solved puzzle or brain teaser as much as they change the tone and texture of Bigby’s relationships with other Fables.

In other words, this is chiefly a narrative experience, and the game’s whodunit is a plot device, not a game mechanic. Collecting evidence may unlock new dialog options, but its main purpose is to deepen the game’s mystery and to force Bigby to make decisions. That said, the choices players make over the course of The Wolf Among Us—some small, some not—form the game’s backbone, and every interaction seems to tie into whatever Rubik’s Cube Telltale is using to drive the narrative.

Unfortunately, performance problems on the iPad 2 crop up with regularity. Stuttering frame rates and delayed inputs make for shambolic action scenes and disrupted cinematics, and The Wolf Among Us suffers from general instability and locks up often. These technical problems are a black spot on an otherwise gorgeous game that really depends on smart camera work and pacing to sustain its story.

Episode 1 — Faith

Early in this episode, Sheriff Bigby explains to Colin, the last remaining of the Three Little Pigs, that he keeps the peace in Fabletown “by being big, and being bad.” It’s a bit on the nose, but Colin’s response cuts to the heart of The Wolf Among Us: “Don’t say that shit in front of people. It’s embarrassing.”

Colin is mostly decrying Bigby’s dumb chest-thumping, but it’s a nice reminder that the characters in The Wolf Among Us have pre-conceived notions about Bigby, that those notions can change based on player input, and the this is primarily a game about exploring relationships in a fairytale society.

One of “Faith”’s strongest scene occurs in a library, where routine bureaucracy comes face-to-face with fairytale magical fantasy. There are the telltale signs of “real” life—a deputy mayor, an administrator, some public health and birth records—juxtaposed with a magic lamp and an omniscient talking mirror that speaks in rhyme. It’s just enough to remind of you of Fables’ allegorical potential while still breathing life into a still-mysterious new environment.

Like in Telltale’s previous series of episodic games, The Wolf Among Us “remembers” certain choices and uses them to shape the story to come. This is an increasingly common (and welcome!) narrative trick, but I’m always a little skeptical of games that notify the player so obviously when it happens. Mr. Toad doesn’t appreciate Bigby’s insistence that he obey the law, for example, as per an on-screen prompt.

Granted, “Faith” is only the first of five episodes. It’s hard to see if and how Bigby’s decision to be kind to Bufkin, the alcoholic Flying Monkey assistant to deputy mayor Ichabod Crane, will play out. What’s clearer is that both Bigby and “Faith”’s plot points are highly malleable.

The knowledge that The Wolf Among Us is keeping tabs bleeds into the quick-time events that govern “Faith”’s fights and chase scenes. Bigby’s potential for ultraviolence rears its head more than once, and whether he chooses to indulge it has, ostensibly, repercussions.

The QTEs themselves are straightforward taps, flicks, and swipes. One pleasant surprise is how flexible they are: you can miss a few prompts without failing, and the fights are choreographed well enough that everything flows naturally, even when a punch or headbutt is flubbed, or skipped on purpose.

Here’s the rub: it’s not always clear what a given QTE will do, or which ones can be skipped without losing the fight, and this has a negative impact on roleplaying. In one early fight, for example, Bigby steals an axe while a QTE prompt hovers near his opponent’s neck. I didn’t want Bigby to become a murderer (at least not yet) so, thinking his next move would be to decapitate someone, I skipped it and failed the fight.

Turns out, Bigby merely uses the flat of the axe to break a man’s jaw. Later, the game explains that these fairytale characters are unnaturally resilient (which, again, is a way to justify how crazy violent this series is). Players familiar with the source material’s various quirks might not be as hesitant with the Woodsman as I was.

But that’s beside the point: When Bigby talks to people, Telltale encourages us to roleplay, to make decisions that have lasting consequences; but when he’s fighting someone, we get bottlenecked. Our choices in “Faith,” such as they are, matter in one context but not the other, and that’s jarring.

In other words, every game mechanic in “Faith” builds upon, changes, or informs some aspect of the narrative, whether it’s the plot, Bigby’s relationships, or others’ perceptions of him. With one enormous, climactic exception, the fight scenes in “Faith” don’t tie into that narrative framework.

Nevertheless, “Faith” puts forward a dense tale that excels and building momentum. Here’s to sustainability.

Episode 2 — Smoke Mirrors

In episodic gaming, as in life, time is double-edged. The model’s great promise is that the piecemeal release of an adventure game builds anticipation among fans while allowing the developer to gather feedback, while a steady flow of cash keeps them nimble and lean. There’s a trap set for every installment of an episodic series, however: “I waited two months for that?”

This is the trap that “Smoke Mirrors,” the second episode in Telltale Games’ The Wolf Among Us series, falls into.

TWAU1-1TWAU1-1

The first episode was bookended by a pair of brutal decapitations and, depending on your choices, punctuated by either a suicide or another murder. “Smoke Mirrors” opts for a more laid-back plot that introduces new characters, suspects, and locations but that does its most interesting work in characterization rather than violent set pieces.

The two-month gap between episodes is felt right away: the finer plot points of “Faith” get lost in the influx of new characters, and “Smoke” struggles to find a rhythm as players try to remember who’s who and why they’re interrogating the Woodsman (or Dweedle Dee). I was tempted to replay the first episode to get back up to speed, but it’s a compliment to Telltale’s brand of designed that I ultimately chose to explore the consequences of my first playthrough.

“Smoke” eventually settles into itself, but it’s a much shorter episode than “Faith.” Its comparative brevity is compounded by the way Telltale shunts Bigby from one scene to the next. One early scene involves Bigby examining a headless body, for example. There are several clues and interaction points to explore, but one in particular triggers the end of investigation, as Deputy Mayor Ichabod Crane swoops in like hideous bird to shoo Bigby out of the room.

TWAU2-1TWAU2-1

You won’t get another crack at the body, even if there are other clues to gather, and the implication is clear: investigating isn’t as important as moving the story forward. Adventure games tend to handle investigation particularly well—and Bigby is a cop, after all—so it’s frustrating that “Smoke” never gives us a chance to do something both the character and mechanics are ostensibly suited for, especially since the investigation in Toad’s apartment in “Faith” worked so well.

That same pressure to move quickly exerts itself through the timed dialogue system that Telltale has been using since The Walking Dead. This kind of design makes sense in the context of a zombie apocalypse, but “Smoke Mirrors” never earns the sense of urgency imposed onto it.

Where “Faith” is violent, “Smoke Mirrors” is seedy, taking Bigby through a strip club, brothel, and flop hotel in short order. It’s unclear at this point whether or not this slum tourism supports a good faith effort to explore the social ills at the foundation of Bill Willingham’s Fables series, but Bigby seems poised to act as the blunt force trauma needed to clear a path for Fabletown’s much-needed reforms. By that same token, there’s an undercurrent of class guilt and noblesse oblige in “Smoke”’s most lurid scenes.

TWAU5-1TWAU5-1

That doesn’t keep the scene between Bigby and Holly, the proprietor and (as far as I can tell) sole employee of the Trip Trap Bar, from being the best in the episode. Not only does it successfully encapsulate the game’s class tension, but it deliver’s on Telltale’s promise of a reactive and responsive gameworld. Holly and Grendel both seem appreciative that I-as-Bigby decided against ripping Grendel’s arm off and beating him with it during the climax of “Faith.” Indeed, the relationship between the player, Bigby, and the other denizens of Fabletown continues to be a highlight of The Wolf Among Us.

It’s too bad, then, that Colin—the sardonic talking pig who appears, unannounced and uninvited, on Bigby’s couch—is totally absent from “Smoke Mirrors.” He was Bigby’s moral compass in “Faith,” but it seems that his services are no longer needed. Bigby’s Good-Cop-Bad-Cop routine works best when both options seem reasonable or realistic, but some of his choices in “Smoke” are cartoonishly prickish, unless you want to get crazy on scared children and traumatized victims.

There aren’t many opportunities in “Smoke” to use Bigby’s potential for unfettered aggression, but the fuzzy boundaries between player and protagonist are explored in other ways. In the opening scene of “Faith,” Bigby is forced to pummel the Woodsman, whether the player wants him to or not. Near the end of “Smoke Mirrors,” he again finds himself in a brawl. “Smoke”’s fight scene is more flexible, and Bigby is allowed to lay off if the player wants.

Later, during the course of a second crime scene investigation, Bigby finds a pack of cigarettes. He doesn’t think they’re important, and the game doesn’t recognize them as an official clue, but I do. Even though Bigby’s investigation is cut short, it doesn’t keep the player from doing his own guesswork outside the confines of the game itself.

What I like about both of these examples is that they give audiences a chance to role-play Bigby naturally and organically, without any formal indication that their decisions are being explicitly framed as Big Moral Choices. The Wolf Among Us is at its best when its mechanics back off enough to let players play.

Still, “Smoke Mirrors” is more often interesting than riveting, consigned to doing The Wolf Among Us’ dirty work: it moves the plot forward in ways that are necessary but not compelling, and touches on the series themes without revealing its hand too early. It’s a short, workmanlike episode, content to stand on “Faith”’s back and prep us for Episode 3, rather than find its own legs.

Publicado por: TouchArcade - Continue lendo: http://toucharcade.com/feed/

Tags:

Este peixe-robô com corpo macio consegue replicar os movimentos de um peixe de verdade

Este peixe-robô é bem impressionante: ele parece muito com um peixe de verdade. Criado no MIT, ele é integrante de um campo da robótica que vem ganhando força, chamada “robótica suave”.

Os “robôs suaves” não apenas possuem um corpo macio, como também contam com canais flexíveis e conseguem imitar com bastante realismo o movimento de organismos. Como um peixe, neste caso. Com corpo de silicone, ele consegue fazer uma manobra com bastante rapidez, mais ou menos como se seu corpo fosse como o de um peixe real.

Ele foi criado a partir de um núcleo rígido, onde fica o seu “cérebro. Uma porção macia utiliza um fluido armazenado em estado gasoso, e a sua liberação é responsável por fazer ele se mover.

Cientistas acreditam que o desenvolvimento deste peixe pode dar um bom impulso para a robótica suave – ele mostra como essa categoria de robôs pode ser mais versátil em certas aplicações em relação às versões “duras”, além de poder ajudar a coletar informações sobre o comportamento desses animais na natureza.

O problema dele é o quanto ele gasta em combustível: ele consegue fazer entre 20 e 30 manobras de fuga antes de parar completamente. Um novo modelo está sendo desenvolvido com a capacidade de nadar por até 30 minutos. Não é nada impressionante – especialmente quando lembramos daquele peixe-robô que pode nadar quase eternamente. [MIT via TechCrunch]

Foto por M. Scott Brauer/MIT News

  • RELACIONADOS
  • DESTAQUES
  • POPULARES


ulppl0a0pywcyrfyfopu

Este braço robótico joga ping-pong melhor que muitos de nós


uarm (2)

Com um preço camarada, uArm pode ser seu primeiro robô


flock copter drones Korbely

Drones autônomos usam GPS e rádio para voarem juntos como pássaros


bots autonomos

Veja como estes robôs autônomos trabalham juntos para criar estruturas


nomades1

Eu, Fernanda Neute, nômade digital. Ou como coloquei meu escritório na praia.


lg tv ces 2014

De tablets a TVs, o que vem por aí nas tecnologias de telas


truedetective2

Sim, você realmente precisa assistir a nova série True Detective


Ivanpah Solar  (1)

As fotos da maior usina solar do mundo, que começou hoje a gerar eletricidade


120 artigos científicos foram criados em “gerador de lero-lero” e ninguém percebeu

120 artigos científicos foram criados em “gerador de lero-lero” e ninguém percebeu


Cientistas desvendam o mistério de experiências fora do corpo

Cientistas desvendam o mistério de experiências fora do corpo


Por que os celulares de passageiros do avião que sumiu na Malásia continuam tocando

Por que os celulares de passageiros do avião que sumiu na Malásia continuam tocando


Uso de apps e grupos de carona podem gerar multa de R$ 5 mil, segundo a legislação brasileira

Uso de apps e grupos de carona podem gerar multa de R$ 5 mil, segundo a legislação brasileira

Publicado por: Gizmodo - Continue lendo: izmoizmododohttp://feeds.feedburner.com/gizmodobr

Tags: , ,

Esta tiara elétrica promete acabar com as dores da enxaqueca

Enxaqueca é um problema, mas você vestiria uma tiara elétrica que dá pequenos choques em nervos do seu cérebro para bloquear a dor? A Cefaly faz isso, e ela foi aprovada pela FDA, órgão responsável pelo controle de alimentos e medicamentos dos EUA. E esse equipamento que promete curar as dores de cabeça causadas pela enxaqueca começa a se expandir pelo mundo.

A Cefaly é uma tiara de cabeça com um estimulador nervoso elétrico que envia pequenas correntes elétricas para o nervo trigêmeo, o maior dos 12 nervos que emergem diretamente do cérebro. O dispositivo é o primeiro aparelho de estimulação nervosa aprovado nos EUA para tratamento e prevenção de dores.

E ele funciona? Bem, em um estudo com 67 pacientes, usuários com a Cefaly relataram uma média de duas dores de cabeça a menos por mês. Cerca de metade dos que usavam a tiara relataram que as dores de cabeça caíram pela metade. O dispositivo, antes de chegar aos EUA, já havia sido aprovado para ser usado na Europa e no Canadá.

A Cefaly diz que em dados coletados desde 2008, apenas 4,3% dos pacientes experienciaram efeitos colaterais médios. Enquanto isso, 50% dos pacientes com enxaqueca sofrem de efeitos colaterais com os medicamentos que tomam.

Talvez você possa colocar uma lente nele e dizer por aí que é um Google Glass. Mas, sinceramente, não sei se isso seria muito melhor.  [Cefaly via MedPageToday]

  • RELACIONADOS
  • DESTAQUES
  • POPULARES


cj9doj9btr1jtie3q7dl

O LED mais fino do mundo tem três átomos de espessura


ve1ichiqufl8cdnorsem

Cientistas hackearam um tocador de Blu-Ray para fazer testes de salmonella


toothpaste

Por que a pasta de dente faz com que tudo fique com um gosto horrível


top virus hunter (1)

Conheça o maior caçador de vírus do mundo


nomades1

Eu, Fernanda Neute, nômade digital. Ou como coloquei meu escritório na praia.


lg tv ces 2014

De tablets a TVs, o que vem por aí nas tecnologias de telas


truedetective2

Sim, você realmente precisa assistir a nova série True Detective


Ivanpah Solar  (1)

As fotos da maior usina solar do mundo, que começou hoje a gerar eletricidade


120 artigos científicos foram criados em “gerador de lero-lero” e ninguém percebeu

120 artigos científicos foram criados em “gerador de lero-lero” e ninguém percebeu


Cientistas desvendam o mistério de experiências fora do corpo

Cientistas desvendam o mistério de experiências fora do corpo


Por que os celulares de passageiros do avião que sumiu na Malásia continuam tocando

Por que os celulares de passageiros do avião que sumiu na Malásia continuam tocando


Uso de apps e grupos de carona podem gerar multa de R$ 5 mil, segundo a legislação brasileira

Uso de apps e grupos de carona podem gerar multa de R$ 5 mil, segundo a legislação brasileira

Publicado por: Gizmodo - Continue lendo: izmoizmododohttp://feeds.feedburner.com/gizmodobr

Tags: , ,

NSA se disfarçava de Facebook para espalhar malware

Então a NSA está nos espionando. Já sabemos disso há algum tempo. O que você provavelmente não sabia era exatamente como eles faziam isso e, de acordo com uma reportagem de Ryan Gallagher e Glenn Greenwald, a agência usava uma rede automatizada mundial de malwares.

Você sabia, por exemplo, que a NSA se fazia passar pelo Facebook às vezes? Como Gallagher e Greenald relataram, “em alguns casos a NSA se disfarçava como um servidor falso do Facebook, e usava o site da rede social para infectar o computador do alvo e extrair arquivos de um disco rígido.” Isso é bem preocupante quando você lembra que os botões “Curtir” do Facebook estão espalhados por toda a internet, dando à NSA muitas oportunidades de colocar um malware no seu disco rígido.

Esse esforço e outros descritos na reportagem foram feitos pela unidade de elite da NSA, a Tailored Acess Operations (TAO). Já falamos sobre ela antes. No ano passado, o Der Spiegel publicou um artigo sobre o TAO, que aqui no Gizmodo chamamos de “esquadrão ninja de elite”. A nova reportagem adiciona alguns novos detalhes, incluindo as ferramentas específicas usadas pela NSA para espionar a nós, nossos amigos… e terroristas em potencial também:

Um plug-in implantado chamado CAPTIVATEAUDIENCE, por exemplo, é usado para assumir o controle do microfone e gravar conversações sendo feitas perto de um computador. Outro, chamado GUMFISH, pode controlar a webcam e tirar fotografias. O FOGGYBOTTOM grava registros da navegação na internet e coleta detalhes de login e senhas usados para acessar websites e contas de email. O GROK é usado para guardar teclas pressionadas. E SALVAGERRABIT extraí dados de discos flash removíveis conectados a um computador infectado.

Nós já sabíamos que a NSA conseguia ouvir nosso microfone e acessar nossa câmera e detalhes de login. A novidade está nas teclas pressionadas, mas não é algo surpreendente. O realmente preocupante é o quão detalhado e bem pensado é esse projeto de infecção por malware. [The Intercept]

  • RELACIONADOS
  • DESTAQUES
  • POPULARES


cupid drone 2

Drone CUPID ataca intrusos com um choque de 80.000 volts


Facebook

O novo Feed de Notícias do Facebook é bem diferente do que esperávamos


aoig2hv8azsmcd4haolq

Yahoo vai acabar com a opção de login com contas do Facebook e Google


facebook messenger windows phone

Facebook Messenger chega ao Windows Phone 8


nomades1

Eu, Fernanda Neute, nômade digital. Ou como coloquei meu escritório na praia.


lg tv ces 2014

De tablets a TVs, o que vem por aí nas tecnologias de telas


truedetective2

Sim, você realmente precisa assistir a nova série True Detective


Ivanpah Solar  (1)

As fotos da maior usina solar do mundo, que começou hoje a gerar eletricidade


120 artigos científicos foram criados em “gerador de lero-lero” e ninguém percebeu

120 artigos científicos foram criados em “gerador de lero-lero” e ninguém percebeu


Cientistas desvendam o mistério de experiências fora do corpo

Cientistas desvendam o mistério de experiências fora do corpo


Por que os celulares de passageiros do avião que sumiu na Malásia continuam tocando

Por que os celulares de passageiros do avião que sumiu na Malásia continuam tocando


Uso de apps e grupos de carona podem gerar multa de R$ 5 mil, segundo a legislação brasileira

Uso de apps e grupos de carona podem gerar multa de R$ 5 mil, segundo a legislação brasileira

Publicado por: Gizmodo - Continue lendo: izmoizmododohttp://feeds.feedburner.com/gizmodobr

Tags: , ,